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The History of Omega As I've Known It

The history of this little town I'm going to tell you about
Isn't much I'm pretty sure, but please don't start to pout.
For I'll not keep you very long, there isn't much to tell
I'll turn (illegible) carefully for you who know it well.

Ill roll back the years for just a while, beginning at the store
Where Charlie Hemmerle kept his post for 20 years or more.
Pauline Blazer keeps there now and I'm just telling you,
When they beat that gal at selling goods, they're far between and few.


Just back of them Bill Fiddler lived; he was the section boss
I've heard them say, Bill was a good old guy except when he'd get cross.
That's gone to Wesley Snyder now, who lives on Market Street
I guess the crew thinks well of him and say he's hard to beat.

Across the tracks to the old depot that's sheltered kith and kin;
The operator that worked there then was known as Daniel Ginn.
How times do change, as we go on; Man power now we lack
A lady holds this office now, at the depot up the tracks.

As we go on just down the way, in keeping with these times,
A blacksmith shop confronted us, it's keeper Dave Wickline.
He's gone on now to the better land to rest a little while
But leaves with those who knew him well the memory of a smile.

But woe is me as I now relate some changes that have been made
We wish sometimes that fate would turn and from our memory fade.
The building now that Wickline owned has gone to a man named Fred
Who turned it into a garage to earn his daily bread.

He's not the best in the world, but yet, he's a good old scout.
He can take your car of any make and turn it inside out;
And put it back together--the engine purrs like a cat.
But when you pay the bill, sir, your pocketbook is flat.

The telephone is ringing, someone's down in a gorge
Of mud up to the axle; Please come get us Mr. George
And away he goes in his faithful truck
and pulls them out of the slime and the muck;
He hauls our coal and hauls our wood
And sometimes hauls our household goods.

Down through the years we go again and on memory's list we search
We grope and gaze with joyful pride on our own old Methodist Church.
She's passed her century's milestone and weathered many a storm,
It's refuge for the weary; a haven to the forlorn.

We have listened to many pastors explain this beautiful way
And know that our Methodist Church is in this town to stay.
For we can do without a lot of things, yet for many things we search
But when it comes to living, we can't do without our church.

Next comes the old brick school house; we remember it so well.
How the children fell in line and marched at the first tap of the bell.
The little ones were up in front just stair-steppin' down-
Maybe you don't think we miss our school-it's a great loss to our town.

The old school house has been transformed into a community hall-
Which extends to you a welcome free to one and all.
The Garden Club has it's flower show; many other meetings too,
And every spring the best of all-we have the Farmers' Institute.

And that's the time for everyone to forget about your woe-
And get the work all done in time so you'll be sure to go.
I'm sure you won't regret it when you see the table spread
With pies and cake and chicken, salads, hot rolls and bread.
But that's not all, we have speakers, too, that's really good to hear
Home talent and many things we hope you like and come again next year.

And Dr. Wills, he lived there then and used to soothe our ills,
But folks, here's one thing that I will say--he gave the most doggoned pills.
But they just up and did the work and you went on you way,
And bet you've not been sick again from that until this day.
But he's gone on to larger fields-on Waverly he did pick
And we haven't any doctor now so you better not get sick.

The old town hall as it was known is on down the line
I can still hear them call the old square dance, why, I've been there many a time.
And used to dance 'chase the Possum and chase the coon,
    Chase the pretty boy 'round the moon,
    Chase the rabbit and chase the squirrel,
    Chase the pretty girl 'round the world'.
But of course that was thirty years ago, when I was just a girl

And the Ladies' Aide one time had a tacky supper there
Soup beans and cornbread ten cents was the price of the bill of fare.
And the lodge Modern Woodsmen and Redmen too met there from time to time
And banquets every now and then and boy, the eats were fine!

Election booths and committees meet and blackface medicine shows
All found a place in the old town hall in the days of long ago.
But time too has changed the old town hall as down the years we search
The building has been remodeled and now is a Holiness Church

The mission on Aldrege Corner has gone it's way as some more
There D.E. Bartram runs a business better known as Clodhopper Store.
On down to Olive Christman and John Rose stores of the past
We regret to say they too have passed on but long will their memory last.

The post office too has taken it's flight along with what seems all the rest
William Maloy was our postmaster; we considered him one of the best.
But of course our carrier's a dandy and we don't think he's a crank
He's known to all on RFD #3 by a pet name, Uncle Frank.

And now we go on to the corner where used to be Elisha Humphrey's mill
A general store there too was in order; the houses are standing there still.
while they're gone on to a land that is fair to wait beside the stream
Where we'll all be ferried across some day to this land of which we dream

Now folks I've done my best in giving this to you
I only hope when the words you check you'll find them much true.
Although I know if you check them close you could find very much to mend,
But Revelations the master, Alpha is the beginning; Omega, the end. 

Author - unknown

May 6, 1908 The Waverly Democrat

  The prospects for fruit  this year is looking fine in our neighborhood.
          Mr. W. M. Siemon is painting his house.
          Mr. David Blair has moved on his new farm.
          W. M. Simon was calling on Conrad Stoll Sunday.
          Messrs Joseph Jenkins, Roy Blair and J. E. Vonschriltz attended church at Meadow Run Sunday evening.
          Mr. H. G. Oyer attended church at Meadow Run Road Sunday.
          Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bandy were visiting relatives at Meadow Run Sunday.
          There was a dance given at the home of Mr. Simon on the evening of the 28th day of April, it was Miss Clara Hinkle and Mr. Vonschriltz birthday and those present were Mr. and Mrs. Fred Eennewit of Alma; Mr. and Mrs. Otto Hibler of Waverly, Mrs. Chas. Oyere and three sons of Higby, J. D. Scott, John Fillinger and Goldie Condon of Omega, Nellie and Geo Hattle, Tena and Amma Scheffer, Miss Tena and Amma Scheffer, Miss Tena and Bertha Stoll of Beaver, Lew Ingalls of Jackson, Mrs. Rosie Minch, Joseph Jenkins of Strait Creek.  A lunch was served at midnight and they received many beautiful presents.
Mr. Forest Clouse returned from Good Hope one day last week.
 
Omega 1908
Canal St. Omega abt 1900

Omega Oh. Canal St. abt 1900 showing the swing bridge over the canal, Humphrey Mill & Store, his home and Home Telephone Headquarters. Note Mr. Humphrey is driving the auto.

picking water melons near Omega & Scioto River Bridge

Picking water melons near Omega and the Scioto River bridge

Dr. J. B. Ray Home near Omega

Dr. J. B. Ray home near Omega.  Dr. Ray is man without the hat.

Dr. J. B. Ray family Dec 1907

Dr. J. B. Ray Family taken December 1907

                                         left to right:

top row: Dr. Jacob B. Ray (1826-Jan 1916), Mrs. Mary C. Ray (Jan 1934-Jan 1907), Mollie Clark, Hugh W. Ray

second row: F. M. Hays, Mrs J. W. Ray, Mr. G. W. Ray, Frank C. Ray (27 Nov 1900-9 Nov 1961)

bottom row: Elnor Hays, Amy H. (Ray)Scott (1894-1928), E. Alida Ray, Henrierra (Ray) Scott (6 May 1847-19 Apr 1918), Edwin Hays 5 Sep 1894-17 Oct 1947), Ivan J. Ray (10 May 1896-15 Mar 1956) and Mr. F. M. Hays

Note: When Dr. Ray died there was no money to buy a tomb stone so Ed Franklin went around and took up a collection to buy a grave stone. (per Vince Scott)

Railroad Station at Omega, Ohio

Looking west at train Station at Omega, Ohio prior to 1890

N&W station at Omega

Train Station at Omega, Ohio prior to 1890

Probably built when the Scioto Valley Railroad was put into operation in 1878. The building was torn down September 1948. Originally was located on the west side of the tracts but was moved about 1910 to the east side and just North of Sallie Blazer's Store when double tracking started. Picture was taken about 1890. At some point in time the tower was removed. Some of the agents were Dan Ginn, James Irvin, Arthur Condon, Jim See, Johnny Warden, Mike Rader, Alice Adams and Sally Blazer. Our thanks to Jim Henry for the pictures and information.

Omega Lost Balloon

Waverly Watchman Jan. 14, 1954
The cemetery would have been the Hatfield cemetery on a hill behind 1145 Higby Road.
 

 

Hatfield Cemetery Picture

Little bit of an idea how bad shape the cemetery was in as of Feb 27, 2011 this is just a small portion.

HAD IT COMING TO HIM

"As the result of a story in The Citizen, John D. Scott, 74, veteran mail carrier at Omega, Pike County, Ohio, has been granted a raise of 200 per cent, in his salary.
"The story which appeared April 2nd, told how Scott has carried mail at Omega for 34 years for $100 a year. During that time he missed but one train, whereupon Uncle Sam promptly fined him $1.50. [Editors note: that is almost a weeks pay]
"Dr. J. F. Jones, 11 W. Goodale Street, interested himself in the veteran's case and sent copies to the Citizen story to Ohio representatives in the House and Senate.
"As a result the postmaster general has announced an increase to $300 a year, effective June 1st.
"Scott raised10 children on his $100 a year salary,"--Columbus, O., Citizen"

7 May 1926 Waverly Watchman

.John Scott picked up the mail from the train and delivered it by wheelbarrow to the post office. Up to closure of mail service August 31, 1935 two trains per day stopped. He died December 31, 1942 at the Pike County Home at Idaho at the age of 90 and is buried in Omega Cemetery but has no tomb stone.

OMEGA MAN RESIGNS

W. H. Maloy (16 May 1868-Jul 1954) who has served as postmaster at Omega for the past 22 years has tendered his resignation to the post office department. Maloy was elected as township clerk of Jackson township at the last election and resigned for that reason. Maloy is a Democrat. His successor has not yet been named.
11 Jan 1934 The Republican Herald

Cloudburst Causes A Flood In Omega On Thursday Evening

An hour-long cloudburst at Omega, Thursday night, sent Wilson Run and Moore's Run roaring out of banks to flood four homes, the garage operated by Fred George, the basement of Miss Pauline Blazer's store and the basement of Miss Sally Blazer's home.
The homes of Mrs. Arlie Scott, Henry Saxton, John Scott and Ben Holcomb were flooded and furniture and floor coverings were badly damaged.
Miss Sally Blazer had 80 chickens drowned when the high waters flooded her yard and garden.
Many gardens in the vicinity were badly damaged and the road leading into the village at the west was covered with water from the swollen runs.

11 Jul 1935 The Republican Herald

Thieves at Omega

Thieves gained entrance to the Blazer store at Omega some time during the night Saturday. Entrance was made by breaking open a door in the rear of the building. According to the county officers who are working on the case, the cash register did not contain any money. No arrest have been made in connection with the robbery.

18 Jul 1935 The Republican Herald

HAYNES LAND SOLD MONDAY

1,700 Acres Bring $12,000--Chas. Vallery and Pauline Blazer Are Purchasers.

Charles Vallery, Waverly farmer and business man, purchased 1,540 acres and Miss Pauline Blazer, of Omega, purchased 160 acres of the C. E. Haynes land located in East Jackson township, Pike County, which sold Monday at Unites States District Court sale. The purchase price of the land by Mr. Vallery was $10,000 and Miss Blazer paid $2,000 for the tract which she purchased. The sale held at the Floyd Anderson store which adjoins a part of the farm was cried by Auctioneer Earl Swepston of Columbus.

1 Sep 1938 The Republican Herald

Sallie Blazer

Pauline "Sally" Blazer 25 Dec 1978

picture courtesy of Betty Gildow

1935 view of Blazer's store

Blazer's store picture courtesy of Betty and William Gildow. William is "Sally" Blazers nephew.

Blazer's Grocery Day of Auction 30 October 1982

Store after the purchase became the Depot Carry Out and burned down 26 Nov 1986 killing Sabin Lee Sanders who was sleeping upstairs.

Blazer's store picture courtesy of Betty and William Gildow. William is "Sally" Blazers nephew.

SANDERS, SABIN LEE, "Funeral services for Sabin Lee Sanders were held 7 p.m. Sunday at the Boyer Funeral Home with the Reverend Kelly Grimmett officiating. Mr. Sanders was dead on arrival at Pike Community Hospital at 3:35 p.m. November 26, after dying in a fire at The Depot Carry-out in Omega, He was 23. Born July 28, 1963 in Ross County, he was the son of Ronald Sanders, of Waverly, and Rita (McCarty) Sanders, of Chillicothe . He was a construction carpenter and a resident of 1154 Liberty Hill Rd. , Chillicothe . Besides his parents he is survived by a daughter, Sheri Sanders, of Piketon; two brothers, Randall Sanders, of Los Angeles , California , and Shane Sanders, of Washington, D. D. ; and maternal grandmother, Agnes McCarty, of Massieville , Ohio ." 2 Dec 1986 Waverly News Watchman

Depot Carry Out Fire Pic
Depot Carry Out Fire Story

Dec. 2, 1986 Waverly News Watchman

9 Mar 1876 The Republican Herald

Omega J. H. Aldrige General Store in 1907

J. H. Aldrige General Store in 1907

Ray McKenny, Earnest Humphrey (1890-1959, Will Rose, Sam White, John Harris, Joe Schwartz (5 May 1882-10 Feb 1953), Walter Maloy 1899-21 Jan 1973), Eliza Maloy, Cutler Maloy, Orn Graves, Clell Cliffton, Mason Maloy, Arthur Condon, Howard Rumfield(-1919), Henry Blazer (22 Dec 1875-23 Jul 1912), Harold Blazer, Sallie Blazer (4 Oct 1903-23 Jul 1912), Marvine Blazer (22 Mar 1902-3 Nov 1992), & Arlie Scott

picture curtsey of Betty Gildow from Sallie Blazer collection

Pancake store on Canal Street in the late 1800s

Bill Gildow May 10, 1951 TRH

May 10, 1951 The Republican Herald

From 1825 Sharonville, now known as Omega was a busy little town. George Corwin that year started a flour mill. He received his water power from Wilson Run, but after the canal was built he purchased his water power from the canal. Slain & McAllister purchased the mill in 1849 they contracted for water power from the canal for 35 years, agreeing to pay the state a year rental of $100. There were eight general stores there, owned by J. F. Condon, R. S. McCoppin, W. K. McMillan, Aldrich and Streitenberger, T. M. Hayes, James M. Bowdish, J. M. Pancake and Joseph Taylor. The latter two were also lumber dealers. There were the Marshall Tile Works, and Blain and Pancake Spoke and Rim Factory. The last owner of the flour mill was Elisha Humphrey, who also had a store in connection with the mill. (Information from Early Waverly and Canal Days) In 1970 when I came to the area the only store was Pauline "Sally" Blazer's Grocery which closed 1982 and the building burned down some time in the 80's killing a resident upstairs. During the mid 70's Tackett's Market opened up but did not stay in business very long and closed up after the owner shot himself in the store. George (1924-1999) and Jeane Gary had a used furniture store, "Gary's Yester-Years Shop" but I do not remember when he opened it up and it closed sometime during the 1990's. Today there are no stores in Omega.

The Joseph Climer post, No. 6092 of the Grand Army of the Republic was organized in 1883 at Omega with Major James C. Foster as it first commander.

A trip on the canal boat Bostona, Captain Wash. Williamson, from Portsmouth to Sharonville in 1866 cost $1.75 and from Chillicothe to Sharonville was $1.00

William McCoy is now running the ferry on his own account. A great many teams cross it every day. Hence, the large amount of business done in the little town of Sharonville, where the Omega post office is run by William McMillin. 10 Sep 1874 The Republican Herald

The Sharonville bridge has collapsed. Mr. Steinhour's threshing machine crossed it and the result is a broken beam. [ July 1892 Pike Co. Republican]

The Sharonville school is taught by William DeLong and Miss Greathouse. Miss Julia Stratton is teaching in the Strait School district near Joseph Vonschroltz's and Miss Dusley is teaching near W. P. Cummona? in Jackson Twp. 9 Dec 1869

Teachers for Jackson Rural: L. O. Ramey, Emery Rapp, Geo. Stoll, Mae Frazier, Matilda Condon, Ruth Harris, Golden Throckmorton and Ruth Snyder

[20 Sep 1934 The Republican Herald]

1910 The Vonschriltz Case Decided

Columbus, O., April 13 - Because Joseph Vonschriltz was a headstrong man his estate will get nothing from Pike County as damages for his death. He was driving a fractious young horse one day when the animal refused to cross a Pike county bridge. Bystanders urged him to let the horse be led but he would not hear to it and began whipping the animal. The horse backed against the railing of the bridge and the whole outfit went over in to the river and the occupant was killed. The widow sued for $10,000 damages, alleging that the railing was not strong. She got a verdict for $5000 in the Pike County Courts, but the supreme court sets it aside. [Is this the Joseph Vonschriltz 11 Mar 1832-25 May 1907 buried in Omega Cemetery?]

HISTORY OF OMEGA THROUGH 30 YEARS I HAVE KNOW IT

The history of this little town, I'm going to tell you about, Isn't much I'm pretty sure, But please don't start to pout. For I'll not keep you very long, There isn't much to tell, I'll turn the pages carefully, For you who know well.
I'll roll back the years for just a while, Beginning at the store where Charlie Hemerle Kept his post for 20 years or more. Pauline Blazer keeps there now And I'm just telling you, When they beat that gal at selling goods, They're far between and few.
Just back of them, Bill Fiddler lived, He was the section boss, I've heard 'em say, Bill was a good old guy, Except when he'd get cross, That's gone to Wesley Snyder now. Who lives on Market street; I guess the crew thinks well of him, And say he's hard to beat.
Across the track to the old depot, That's sheltered kith and kin, The operator that worked there then, Was known at Daniel Ginn. How time does change, as we go on. Man power now we lack, A lady holds the office now, At the depot up the tracks.
As we come on, just down the way, In keeping with these times, A blacksmith shop confronted us, It's keeper, Dave Wickline. He's gone on now to the Better Land, To rest a little while; But leaves with those who knew him well, The memory of a smile. But woe is me as I now relate Some changes that been made, We wish sometime that fate Would turn and from our memory fade.

The building now that Wickline owned, Has gone to a man named Fred Who turned it into a garage, To earn his daily bread. He's not the best man in the world, But, yet, he's a good old scout He can take your car of any make, And turn it inside out, And put it back together The engine purrs like a cat, But when you pay the bill, sir, Your pocket-book is flat. The telephone is ringing, Some one's down in a gorge Of mud, up to the axle, Please come and get us, Mr. George, And away he goes in his faithful truck, And pulls them out of the slime and muck. He hauls our coal, and hauls our wood, And sometimes hauls our household goods.
Down through the years we go again, And on memory's list we search We stop and gaze with joyful pride On our own old Methodist church. She's past her century's milestone, And weathered many a storm, It's a refuge for the weary, A haven to the forlorn, We have listened to many pastors, Explain this beautiful way, And now that our Methodist church Is in this town to stay. For we can do without a lot of things, Yet for many things we search But when it comes to living, We can't do without the church.
Next comes the old brick school house, We remember it so well; How the children fell in line and marched, At the first tap of the bell. The little ones were up in front Just stair steppin' down, Maybe you don't think we miss our school, It's a great loss to our town. The old school house has been transformed Into a Community Hall, Which extends to you a welcome, Free to one and all. The Garden Club has its flower show, Many other meetings, too, And every spring, the best of all, We have the Farmer's Institute.

And that's the time for everyone, To forget about your woe, And get the world all done in time. So you'll be sure to go. I'm sure you won't regret it, When you see the table spread With pie and cake and chicken, Salads, hot rolls and bread. But, that's not all, we have speakers, too, That's really good to hear, Home talent and many things We hope you'll like, And come again next year.
And Dr. Wills, he lived there then, And used to soothe our ills; But folks, here's one thing that I will say, He gave the most doggonedest pills, But they just up and did the work, And you went on your way, And bet you've not been sick again, From that, until this day, But he's gone on to larger fields On Waverly he picked; And we haven't any doctor now So you better not get sick.
The old town hall as it was known, Is right down the line, I can still hear 'em call the old square dance Why, I've been there many a time, And used to dance "Chase the 'Possum and Chase the Coon" Chase the Pretty Boy 'Round the Moon; Chase the rabbit and chase the squirrel, Chase the pretty girl 'round the world"; But, of course, that was thirty years ago, When I was just a girl. And the Ladies' Aid one time, Had a turkey supper there, Soup beans and corn bread, Ten cents was the price of the bill of fare.
And the lodge, Modern Wood- men and Red men, too, Met there from time to time; And banquets every now and then, And boys, the cats were fine. Election booths and committee meets And black-face medicine shows All found a place in the old town hall, In the days of long ago But time, too, has changed the old town hall, As down the years we search, The building's been remodeled And is now a Holiness church.

The mission on Aldredge Corner has gone its way a some more, There D. E. Bartram runs a business, Better known as Clodhopper Store. On down to Oliver Christman and John Rose stores of the past, We regret to say that they, too, have passed on, But long will their memory last. The post office, too, has taken it flight, Along with what seems all the rest, William Maloy was our postmaster, We considered him one of the best, But, of course, our carrier's a dandy, And we do not think he's a crank.
He is known to all on R. F. D. 3 But a pet name "Uncle Frank" And now we go on to the corner Where used to be Elisha Humphrey's mill. A general store, there, too was in order, The houses are standing there still. While they're gone on to a land that is fair, To wait beside of the stream, Where we'll all be ferried across some day.
Now folks, I've done my very best, In giving this to you, I only hope when the words you check, You'll find them very much true, Although I know if you check them close, You could find very much to mend, But in Revelations, the Master says, Alpha is the beginning, Omega is the end.

-(by Mrs. Emma Saxton, Waverly rfd 3, (Omega).

15 March 1945 The Republican Herald

(Emily Saxon 1894-1970)

Omega Threatened By Burning Brush

100 Acres Of Blazing Farmland Swept Up To Southern Outskirts On Monday

A fire which at first was only reported in Waverly as a small brush fire five miles east of here Monday afternoon turned out to be a raging inferno whipped by a 25-mile-per-hour wind which threatened the village of Omega. It was reported the flames came within five or six feet of some of the houses in the south end of town, and covered approximately 100 acres before being brought to a halt.
Authorities said that the fire was caused by a farmer in the vicinity starting a brush fire, which went out of control, the flames catching adjoining fields.
According to the report by mid-afternoon most of the acreage in the west bottoms of the Scioto River from about two miles northeast of Waverly were ablaze.
From early afternoon Omega residents, farmers, the state forestry fire fighters and an N & W railroad crew and other volunteers battled the spreading fire.
As the flames reached the Omega cemetery and the yards of two homes on the southern limits of the village, the Piketon Fire Department joined in the battle by setting backfires and digging trenches, thus preventing the fire from damaging homes in the vicinity.
Electric service into Omega was shut-off for a short time during the afternoon when a pole carrying the power lines was burned.
Fire warden, Harold Lump of Scioto Trail State Forest reported the Lloyd Myers and Joe Hardesty manned the forestry pump truck and were capably assisted by six Waverly High school boys, Donald Ross, Sonny Walters, Russell Latham and Jack Rider.
Adding to the consternation of Omega inhabitants was the low later levels in the creek and the nearby Scioto river.
Under the supervision of Fire Chief Frank Baldwin of Piketon, six members o his department did yeoman work on the e tank truck watering down a strip in front of the advancing blaze. Chief Baldwin was assisted by John Foster, Ed Ritchie, Leslie Snyder, Paul Ware, Sam Sanders and Frank Cutler.
The local fire department of Pee Pee township truck was unable to answer the alarm because the fire was in Jackson township, with which it has no contract for protection.
However, two members of the local fire department, Pat Paterson and Charles Heibel, also assisted as fire wardens.
Mr. Myers of the State Forestry department said the he also had word of a 15-acre brush fire near Lake White which was brought under control Monday night.
Chief Hayes of the Waverly department said that he also had information of a 46-acre fire near Camp Creek in southern Pike county Sunday.
High winds were blamed for helping speed up the drying of the fields and woods which had had no rain for a two week period.

 
18 Feb 1954 The Waverly Watchman

BARBER SHOP IN OMEGA

I have just opened a Barber Shop in the D. E. Bartram building. I solicit the patronage of all ladies and gents in and around Omega. Ladies or gents cut 35c, shave 15c

LEE SNYDER

The Waverly Watchman 6 Jan 1927

Note: Bartram building was located near where the old bridge crossed the Scioto river.

Red Men Sept. 1910

1910 Picture of Red Men September 1910 owned by Elaine Nichols-Tipton

Picture location unknown but most of the men are from the Omega area

It is known that the Red Men met in what is now the Church of Christ in Christian Union. The building had two floors at the time and was built as the Odd Fellow Lodge. The lower floor was used for church socials, public speaking, dancing and roller skating. It was also used by the Grange, Modern Wood Men, and the Red Men. What we now see is the top floor as the bottom was removed.

Standing:
1.
2. Emory Bauer
3. William Woods
4. Dave Wickline
5.
6. Renick Vest
7. A.R. Condon
Kneeling:
1. D. Allen Stauffer
2. William Hattle
3. Lewis (Lou) Rapp
4.
5.
6.
7. Bus Rose
Omega CCCU

At one time this was a two story building and was known as Red Men Hall. What you see is the top floor as the bottom floor was removed. The Red Men claim to be America's Oldest Fraternal Organization Chartered by Congress. Click for Improved Order of Red Men

The Tenth Annual Possum Supper and Campfire of Joseph Crimer Post 602 GAR (Grand Army of Republic Civil War Veterans of the Union Army) will be held at the hall in Omega on Friday evening Dec. 7. from Oct. 5, 1900 Waverly News Note: this is building on the left.

 

Condon Omega Hotel early 1900's

Condon Omega Hotel early 1900's

Condon Omega Hotel 13 April 2008

The sad state of the Condon Omega Hotel (if it is)13 April 2008. It was torn down November 2011

Omega School/Grange Hall

Township Building located in Omega

Please email additions or corrections to manager@waverlyinfo.com.

Or mail to Waverly City Guide, 455 Hay Hollow Road, Chillicothe, Ohio 45601

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